Can A Naturepedic Crib Mattress Help Mom Get More Sleep?

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When I was pregnant with my son, I had very unreal expectations in the sleep department. I was told the baby would sleep 12 to 15 hours a day and would be eating about every four hours. That added up fine for me – baby eats at 8:00 p.m., sleeps until midnight, eats again, sleeps until 4:00 a.m., eats again, sleeps until 8:00 a.m. – I shouldn’t have any trouble fitting 7 or 8 hours of sleep in there, right? Wrong; oh so very wrong.

In case you’re not initiated, it goes more like this: baby eats then gets to sleep about 8:30 p.m. You have some things to finish up; you hit the sack at 11:00. Baby wakes up hungry at midnight. You feed him, but he’s tired and keeps falling asleep. So the eating process is very slow. An hour later, he’s fed. But now he’s awake, smiling and gurgling, and he wants to play! An hour later, he’s ready to go back to sleep. Now there’s two hours left until the 4:00 a.m. feeding. You have a little trouble getting back to sleep and, an hour after you finally doze off, it’s feeding time again. This time it doesn’t take quite as long but, still, it’s 5:30 before you get back to sleep. At 7:00 a.m. you’re woken by your husband getting ready for work, and the 8:00 a.m. feeding follows shortly thereafter.

You’ve had since 8:30 p.m. the night before to get 7 or 8 hours sleep, but you’ve only slept 3 ½ hours! And this could go on for months. Obviously, the solution is to get the baby on your schedule as soon as possible so he, and you, can sleep through the night.

Can a Naturepedic crib mattress help? While I certainly can’t say an organic cotton crib mattress free of PVC/vinyl, phthalates and other potentially harmful chemicals will help a baby sleep through the night, look at it this way: Studies have linked phthalates to a lot of health problems: hormonal and structural reproductive development in boys, asthma and rhinitis in both male and female children, and effects on the pituitary, thyroid, thymus, ovaries, testes, lung, kidneys, liver, and blood in animal studies – more human studies are needed.

Really, how well would you sleep with that going on?

p.s.  If you’re interested in a print of the fabulous painting above, “Sleeping Mother” by Christian Krohg, click the image.

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