Archive for the ‘Babies and children’ Category

First Candle Works to Help Babies Reach Their First Birthday

Monday, July 21st, 2014

First Candle Safe Sleep Media Star logoIn a perfect world, every baby arrives at his or her first birthday, giggling and happy. First Candle is working toward that world.

The organization is dedicated to researching and preventing sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs), striving to put an end to the devastation of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome) and stillbirths. Both a research and advocacy group, First Candle also provides resources to help families touched by these tragedies. The name First Candle refers to that very first candle on a cake celebrating a one-year birthday. According to the organization, every year in the U.S. there are 26,000 stillbirths and 4,000 infants under one year who die unexpectedly.

In addition to spearheading research, First Candle also educates through their website and outreach programs. Their website alone is full of tips to help keep baby safe, including swaddling suggestions, basics for creating safer sleep environments, healthy practices for expecting moms, and more. Expecting parents can even download and print their own Kick Count Chart.

One of First Candle’s latest initiatives is the Safe Sleep Media Stars Campaign. According to First Candle, a study of magazines targeted to women of child-bearing age revealed that more than one-third of marketing images showed babies sleeping face down or in other unsafe sleep positions and more than two-thirds depicted babies in unsafe sleep environments. Through the Media Stars Campaign, First Candle promotes responsible media imagery of sleeping babies in print and online.

First Candle offers plenty of tips for moms and moms-to-be, but their website is also valuable to dads, grandparents, caregivers, and anyone and everyone who interacts with babies (or shows images of sleeping babies). By increasing awareness, First Candle works with everyone to collectively help each baby reach that first adorable birthday.

As a First Candle Media Star, Naturepedic has pledged to only show sleeping babies resting in safe positions or environments.

 

 

Naturepedic Handmade Mattresses: Real People, Real Quality

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

 

Our mattresses are handmade. Really.

A toy zipping down a conveyor belt, made from wooden pieces cut by a pre-programmed robotic machine then painted by an automated sprayer but in the end assembled with four bolts by hand is not “handmade” in my mind. To me, handmade is something lovingly made by a real person or persons.

Naturepedic mattresses are handmade in the classic sense.686A9499

Our manufacturing plant in Ohio (fully certified to the stringent Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), by the way) doesn’t use an assembly line, for starters.  Instead, you’ll see stations where skilled craftspeople are sewing, cutting, and otherwise building mattresses, each person paying close attention to the job at hand. The process reminds me of watching an heirloom guitar being hand built.

One of the greatest features of this approach is every individual employee in our factory is empowered to stop the process if something isn’t right, and by right, I mean perfect. One of our greatest sources of pride is the pride our employees put into their craft. Of course we use machines and tools, particularly for stitching, but behind every machine or tool is a detail-oriented person obsessively checking for quality.

Coils, made in house, are individually wrapped in organic cotton sleeves and hand attached

My favorite part, and one of the most remarkable processes to watch, is the creation of metal coils, each individually wrapped in organic cotton fabric. Amazing. To do this, we use reconditioned vintage machines from Europe that are in themselves things of beauty. The machinery creates the coiled springs from straight wire, compresses the coil and allows them to be sewn into the cotton pockets. The precision machinery, while old, is exceptionally complicated, with a remarkable number of moving parts. After each coil is wrapped, a craftsman hand attaches the individual coils.

The bottom line is we simply don’t take short cuts. We craft mattresses with real people, skillfully working together to make awesome products. That’s what I call handmade.

To watch some of the handmade process and to catch a glimpse of the machinery I mentioned above that coils the wires, check out our award-winning video.

Busting Dust Mites

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014
House_Dust_Mite

Not pretty things. Luckily, they can’t see each other. (c) Wikipedia, Creative Commons

I’m glad dust mites are too small to see because honestly, they’re nasty looking. Luckily, even with exceptional eye sight, you’re not going see a creature that measures a fraction of a millimeter (and they aren’t going to see you as they have no eyes).

As allergies go, reactions to dust mites are common, with the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) estimating around 20 million Americans suffer from dust mite allergies. Ironically, for a creature that can jump start breathing and asthma problems in people, the little eight-legged creature itself doesn’t have a respiratory system.

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology says high levels of dust mite exposure is a significant factor in the development of asthma in children, so it makes sense to take precautions, particularly for babies who can’t use words to explain what ails them. Because the crib mattress is the most prominent piece of furniture where babies might spend half of their day sleeping and playing, this is the first best place to begin. While there is disagreement among experts on the overall effectiveness of allergy encasements for mattresses, their usage continues to be recommended by the AAFA and other major asthma foundations.

The waterproof surface of Naturepedic crib mattresses already acts as a dust mite barrier that covers the entire mattress. Seamless models mean no access points for mites or contaminants and also mean an easy wipe-clean surface. Experts recommend washing sheets at least weekly for dust mite control, but you’ll be likely doing that anyway with a baby.

Naturepedic organic crib waterproof mattress with built-in dust mite barrier

Naturepedic organic crib waterproof mattress with built-in dust mite barrier

Our crib mattresses are waterproofed with food grade polyethylene, meaning they do not have phthalates which are found in dust mite covers made with vinyl. We also offer a 2-sided mattress for older children with one side waterproofed, so it has a dust mite barrier on one side.

Dust mites are a part of nature, so you won’t eliminate them, particularly in humid climates, but you can limit their allergenic effects.  Some secondary efforts, according to the AAFA, include avoiding wall-to-wall carpeting in bedrooms and using blinds instead of fabric curtains (or at least washing fabric curtains often).

Additionally, the group recommends avoiding uncovered pillows and down-filled covers, recommendations geared more toward older kids.  For babies, to reduce the risk of SIDS the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends not placing pillows, covers, bumper or stuffed animals in a crib at all.

Learn more about our waterproof crib mattresses with dust mite barriers.

 

Naturepedic Founder Barry Cik Discusses Chemicals in Crib Mattresses and University of Texas Study

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

A recent study published February of this year by a team of environmental engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has found that infants are exposed to high levels of chemical emissions from crib mattresses.

Below, Naturepedic founder Barry A. Cik explores aspects related to this report to provide a greater understanding of the overall topic of chemicals in crib mattresses.

 

Friends and Colleagues,

I’ve been asked by several people to comment on the University of Texas study regarding chemicals in crib mattresses.  In particular, people want to understand the practical implications of chemicals in crib mattresses.  I’ll use a Q & A format.

 Are Chemicals Really a Problem?

The chemical problem is quite well established.  For example, the American Academy of Pediatrics says the following:

“Over the past several decades, tens of thousands of chemicals have entered commerce and the environment, often in extremely large quantities…A growing body of research indicates potential harm to child health from a range of chemical substances…there is widespread human exposure to many of these substances…These chemicals are found throughout the tissues and body fluids of children and adults alike…”   [Policy Statement – Chemical Management Policy: Prioritizing Children’s Health; American Academy of  Pediatrics, April 25, 2011; http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2011/04/25/peds.2011-0523 ]

Naturepedic Founder Barry A. Cik talks chemical safety during the grand opening of the company's Beverly Hills gallery

Naturepedic Founder Barry A. Cik talks chemicals during the grand opening of the company’s California gallery

There are approximately 84,000 chemicals in the marketplace.  Most have been created since World War II, and never existed on planet Earth before.  An additional 1,000 new chemicals are created every year.  Most (actually, virtual all) chemicals have never been tested for toxicity or health concerns.  The EPA has the authority to take action for many other concerns, but, for chemicals, the EPA has virtually no authority.  Of the 84,000 chemicals in the marketplace, the EPA has so far banned five (5).

What Are the Primary Types of Chemicals of Concern in Crib Mattresses?

Flame Retardant Chemicals -  These primarily include Phosphate, Brominated, and sometimes Chlorinated or Antimony Flame Retardants.  When a chemical gets undue attention, and certainly if it gets banned, manufacturers tend to turn to other flame retardant chemicals.  But these substitutions are frequently known as “regrettable substitutions” because the new versions generally prove to be no better than the previous versions.  Various flame retardant chemicals have been associated with toxicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, developmental issues, endocrine disruption, and reproductive issues, etc.

Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) – PFCs are used as water-repellants and stain-repellants, and are frequently used to make the surface fabric of a crib mattress water-repellant.  In addition to being carcinogenic, one fairly recent study associated perfluorinated compounds with Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities [Philip J. Landrigan, Children’s Environmental Health Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York & Luca Lambertini, National Institutes of Health; published in Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 120, Number 7, July 2012.]

Phthalates – Phthalates are used to soften vinyl, and are linked to cancer and developmental issues.  Six phthalate chemicals were banned by Congress several years ago (as part of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008) and a seventh has been added to California Prop 65.  Meanwhile, there are at least an additional seven or eight new phthalate versions now on the market, as well as other phthalate substitutes, which are technically legal (i.e. not banned) and are being used.  No one knows the effects of these substitute chemicals, and whether they will ultimately be shown to have better or worse or substantially the same health concerns.

Where Are Flame Retardants Found?

They can be found in the surface fabric of a crib mattress, and/or in a flame barrier directly beneath the surface fabric, and/or in the foam inside the mattress.  Most synthetic fabrics on the market are flame-resistant because flame-retardant chemicals have been added into the fibers when the synthetic fibers were made.  In the case of natural fabrics, being that the fibers themselves are natural and not synthetically created, the flame-retardant chemicals are generally added at any of several later stages of the fabric processing.

What About Using “Inherently” Flame Resistant Fabrics?

The industry sometimes uses the word “inherently” loosely.  When a mattress manufacturer buys a fabric to be used on the mattress, the mattress manufacturer generally would not even know the exact chemical formulation of the fabric (which may have been made by a third party, and perhaps in China), and would not know what flame retardant chemicals have been added into the fibers.  If the fabric that is used on the mattress passes the flammability test, then the mattress manufacturer will frequently simply call it an “inherently” flame-retardant fabric.  However, the only truly “inherently” flame-resistant fabrics in the marketplace are fabrics that are made with fiberglass.

What About “Soybean Foam”?

Soybean Foam, Soy Foam, Eco Foam, Harvest Foam ™, Plant Derived Foam, etc. are all marketing terms.  They are all Polyurethane Foam, except that some soybean or castor oil has been used to replace some of the polyols in the mix.  The Law Label regulations require that these materials not be identified by their marketing terms.  Rather, they must be identified by their correct technical term – which is Polyurethane Foam.

What About GREENGUARD and Other Certification Programs?

GREENGUARD is an excellent emissions certification program (and was introduced to the mattress community by Naturepedic).  However, even GREENGUARD has its limits.  For example, GREENGUARD only tests for the legally banned phthalates, but doesn’t test for all the replacements in the marketplace that are being used.  There are other certification programs available as well.  In each case, it is helpful to understand what is and is not being tested or evaluated.

Of all the certification options available in the marketplace, the certified organic program offered by the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is the most thorough.  It requires the use of certified organic fabrics and fill, and provides a high degree of chemical safety vetting for all other non-organic components that are required in a mattress.

How Do We Stop the Use of Inappropriate Chemicals?

Manufacturers and consumers can take several steps right now.  Chemicals of concern used in the manufacturing of a mattress can be replaced with less hazardous alternatives.  This reduces the risk up-front.  Then, exposure can frequently be limited in the product design and/or by separating the baby from the consumer item.  In the case of a crib mattress, this might include the use of an organic pad over the mattress.  Then, of course, manufacturers should be required to disclose and be transparent regarding what is being offered to the consumer.

Ultimately, the American Academy of Pediatrics says it best:  “Manufacturers of chemicals are not required to test chemicals before they are marketed…Concerns about chemicals are permitted to be kept from the public…those who propose to market a chemical must be mandated to provide evidence that the product has been tested…relevant to the special needs of pregnant women and children…”   [ibid]

-  Barry A. Cik

 

Organic Mattresses Just for Kids

Wednesday, June 4th, 2014

Ever wonder how a mattress made specifically for a kid varies from an adult mattress? Isn’t it simply the same twin-sized mattress as an adult twin-sized mattress?

Not at Naturepedic. Our certified organic mattresses for kids are designed specifically for developing bodies. Here’s how.

Be Firm with Your Kids

Essential for babies, a firm sleeping surface also benefits the developing bodies of older children. Naturepedic mattresses for kids feature a steel coil innerspring, and alternating coil directions create a strong stable feel and a medium-firm support perfect for kids. This added level of firmness might seem too firm for most adult preferences, but it’s best for kids’ growing bodies.

Additionally, our kid mattresses are made with a heavy duty edge support. This edge strength is a perfect reinforcement to allow adults to sit on the edge of the bed without sagging to read that bedtime story.

Get On Out, Allergies

In adult mattresses, organic wool and latex are awesome, but as adults, we probably have learned what allergens to avoid. In terms of babies and kids, our focus is on safety first and foremost, so our kids’ mattresses do not include latex or 100_0084wool. You will also find no coconut coir, another possible allergen due to the latex bonding agent. Because young ones with little-sized lungs sleep on these mattresses, we feel the best approach is to simply avoid possibly allergenic materials altogether, just in case.

Like all our mattresses, Naturepedic kids’ mattresses are free of polyurethane foam and vinyl and are made without pesticides, PFCs, chemical flame retardants and other questionable chemicals, and that’s not just our word. Our mattresses are certified organic to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) and meet stringent clean air standards from UL/GREENGUARD. While all of this is beneficial to children with chemical sensitivities, we believe everybody benefits from reduced chemical exposure.

The Wetting Planner

When young children move from the crib to a big kid mattress, the occasional bed wetting accident can happen. The Naturepedic 2-in-1 bed for kids has one side fully waterproofed. This means easy clean-up without the need for an additional protective cover. Nice. Even better, our waterproofing is accomplished without PFCs or the phthalates found in vinyl, instead using food grade polyethylene.

As the child gets older, flip the mattress over for a quilted organic cotton fabric side. While the quilted side has a softer feel, it nonetheless provides a medium firm support.

100_0071The easy-to-clean wipe down surface of the waterproof side is also a benefit when kids get sick, regardless of age. As a parent I know how much I worry when my kids aren’t feeling good. Flipping the mattress to the waterproof side won’t help us parents worry less about our children, but it does mean we won’t need to add those extra layers of blankets or plastic shields to protect the bed.

Kid Power

Naturepedic mattresses for kids - kid friendly inside and out

Naturepedic mattresses for kids – kid friendly inside and out

Naturepedic mattresses for kids are designed specifically to support their unique needs while also making life easier for parents.

Learn more about our mattresses for kids, or even better check them out at any store carrying our kids’ mattresses.

What is Organic Certification?

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

What is large? Bigger than a mailbox? An elephant? A gymnasium?

Big ... but maybe not to a dinosaur! (CC license , Eve Livesey, photographer, on freestock.ca

Big … but maybe not to a dinosaur!
(CC license , Eve Livesey, photographer, on freestock.ca)

The word “large” holds no value without a reference point. A sandwich the size of a dachshund is large. An alligator that size is not.  The same holds true for “organic.”

Alone, the word “organic” is of questionable value. If you’re trying to sell me a product, I have even more reason to question the value of that word, as it will often be contorted to imply elements that simply are not there.

WHAT DOES ORGANIC MEAN?

If a mattress contains “organic” cotton but has a cotton fabric cover treated with a chemical flame retardant, is the mattress organic?  What if the mattress is waterproofed with chemicals like PFCs?  You probably don’t want a mattress off gassing fair amounts of VOCs regardless of whether there is organic cotton there or not, so how do you know what “organic” actually means on a label? How do you know if the label is even truthful?

You demand certification to a rigorous, globally recognized, third-party verified standard such as Global Organic Textile Standard (GOLS)  or the Global Organic Latex Standard (GOLS). Whether for an individual component or an entire finished product, a global standard defines and ensures materials or products live up to the definition.

RED FLAGS FOR THE GREEN WORLD

So what greenwashing organic logo tricks are out there? Here are a few:

 Organization Memberships as Proof

Be cautious when you see memberships to organic and environmental organizations and groups used to prove organic authenticity of a product. We proudly belong to many organic and sustainability organizations but know membership doesn’t verify our products. While we are members of the Organic Trade Association (OTA), for example, we don’t suggest that demonstrates our mattresses are organic; we use GOTS to show that. Sadly that sneaky join-a-club logic is used by some companies: pay membership dues to a trade organization then use the organization logo to “prove” organic veracity. It just doesn’t work that way.

Improperly Used Logos

Naturepedic uses USDA certified organic cotton grown in Texas which we proudly mention on our website. What you won’t see though is the USDA logo on our mattresses. Why? Because that is a label for agricultural materials. The USDA does not certify cotton fabric, furniture or mattresses. They don’t even allow the use of their logo on manufactured products, so if you see that logo, it doesn’t verify the mattress or fabrics are certified organic.

Fake Certifications or Meaningless Graphics

The great thing about living in the information age is you can quickly find out the details of a “certification” with a quick online search. If you’ve never heard of a certification before, it’s time to check.

The FTC is becoming more vigilant against deceptive green labeling practices, but that they won’t catch all offenders. In 2013 the FTC required EcoBaby to stop using their made-up NAOMI organic seal. The FTC said the logo gave the impression of a third-party, independent certification based on objective criteria, which wasn’t the case. In this extreme example, the company had actually created a false, and meaningless, certification!

Similar to fake certifications are eye-pleasing graphics masquerading as certifications. A pretty image of a leaf that reads “organic,” “earth friendly,” or some other green claim may simply be a picture created by the company’s graphic artist.

Pieces vs. Whole

We offer GOTS certification for our entire mattresses, but that certification can also be for individual components. (Our entire manufacturing facility is GOTS certified.)  GOTS-certified components are great. However, if you want your entire mattress GOTS certified, be careful. Sometimes the GOTS logo is used to imply a whole product is certified when in reality only select components are.

 WHY CERTIFICATION? SO YOU KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GETTING.

Look for the GOTS logo for organic authenticity

Look for the GOTS logo for organic authenticity

The bottom line is independent, legitimate organic certification lets you understand exactly what you’re getting, and not what a company wants you to think you’re getting.  Demand more and understand what a certification means.

Otherwise, you might just get a pretty logo and a bunch of chemicals.

Opinions DO matter!

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

When it comes to buying new and more expensive products, the internet has been a saving grace for me.  I scour various sites and blogs for any reviews I can find so that I can make the most informed decision possible based on my needs and the experiences of my peers with similar products.  Getting actual user feedback on various models and brands, I feel more confident when I finally lay down my hard earned money.

Don’t just take our word for it!  Naturepedic has been working with bloggers for several years and we thought you would love an easy place to see our reviews.  We live in such a fast paced world that anything we can do to save you time in researching our products would be of value to you.

StumbleUpon.com is the perfect venue to provide this service to you.  Each week, we add new product reviews and blogger giveaways to our StumbleUpon Likes page.  We are also adding in all of our past reviews so you can have as many reviews to look through as possible for the products you are interested in.  There will be other interesting articles and press releases about our company that you might enjoy as well.
StumbleUponWhat a great way to collect all of your favorite information and sites in one spot for reading at a later time or to share with your friends and family.  If you like what you read, give a thumbs up and add the link to your own StumbleUpon page.  Be sure to Follow us so you can see when new reviews and giveaways come in. Start Stumbling?

Meet Me at the White House

Friday, April 11th, 2014

(c) wikipedia

Many years ago, I had the chance to meet the President of the United States. The honor and reverence that the Presidency deserves also applies to other distinctly American offices, buildings, and processes. So, when I had the chance to lobby at The White House before The White House Environmental Council, my patriotism swelled and I took the assignment more serious than any other effort. Speaking of serious, I was fortunate to be discussing one of the most serious and important issues facing our nation and our citizens . . . potential reform of the Toxic Substances Control Act.

The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) was passed by the United States Congress in 1976. Just to put that into perspective, in 1976 gas was $.59 a gallon, Jimmy Carter beat Gerald Ford for the Presidency, Nadia Comaneci was winning gold in the Olympics, and some upstart named Sylvester Stallone was in a new movie called “Rocky.”

TSCA was supposed to regulate the introduction of new or already existing chemicals. Many have viewed it as a tremendous failure mostly due to the fact that it grandfathered most existing chemicals at the time – while also giving chemical manufacturers a long period of time to introduce new, untested chemicals before the new law took effect.

Bottom line, it is absurd and scary the lack of impact this legislation has had in protecting our fellow Americans. Seriously… is this a joke… our government leaders haven’t addressed the use of dangerous chemicals in our lives and consumer products in nearly 40 years?

Last year, the bipartisan team of Senator David Vitter (R-LA) and Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) introduced legislation to start the TSCA review process. Tragically, Lautenberg died a short time later but there is still activity in Congress to get something done in 2014 with either modified or new TSCA related bills.

Although these efforts are good news, the devil is in the details and concerned citizens should push for TSCA reform that protects consumers. The chemical industry also claims to be supportive of TSCA reform but that should be greeted with a raised eyebrow. The bad bills that are currently introduced could actually do more harm than good. A bad bill supported by the chemical industry could give them tremendous protections, remove concerns about current state requirements, all the while giving them the chance to feign being a good corporate citizen.

newlogoOur company, Naturepedic, is a great story: we make organic crib and adult mattresses. We were founded 10 years ago when our owner, an environmental scientist with a prolific chemical background, went into a baby store to buy a crib mattress for his grandchild. Thanks to his technical science background, he knew it was ludicrous to put a baby on a mattress made with plasticizers, flame retardants and other questionable chemicals.

In a life changing moment, upon his questioning, the clerk stated, “Well, it must be safe or else the government wouldn’t allow us to sell it.” The truth is, there are around 80,000 chemicals in use today with only a miniscule fraction that have truly been tested for their potentially dangerous impacts. Most average citizens have no idea what chemicals they are exposing themselves to and the government has failed them.

The good news is there are some great companies leading the fight. As stated, Naturepedic doesn’t want you or your baby sleeping on a pile of chemicals.

The American Sustainable Business Council is leading the fight to remove harmful chemicals from consumer products. Naturepedic and Lullaby Earth support this initiative. Other responsible companies like, for example, Seventh Generation and Ben and Jerry’s, have also joined with the ASBC to remove harmful chemicals from consumer products.

There are “better” chemicals . . . and there are better ways of doing things without some chemicals . . . and if done correctly, TSCA reform could be one of the most important pieces of legislation ever passed. Congress still teeters around 18% approval ratings. Here is a bipartisan effort that both sides could agree on that would mean everything to the safety of our people . . . whether they knew it or not. Editorial boards across the country need to become engaged and use their influence to let Congress know this is one issue they better get right.

Naturepedic Certified Organic Mattresses: How They’re Made

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

 

People love to see things built.  Shows like Discovery Channel’s How It’s Made cater to our fascination to watch finished products emerge from raw materials.

Having an office near the Naturepedic manufacturing floor, I often watch giant rolls of organic cotton, wool and other materials turn into finished mattresses at the hands of talented craftspeople.  Like a sunset, I don’t tire of watching it.

Thanks to agency Flourish Inc. you can spend 2-1/2 minutes experiencing the cool factor of our factory in Luxury Organic Mattresses: A Behind The Scenes Look.  As a result of Flourish’s brilliant vision and execution in creating this video, you can truly get a sense of the craftsmanship and pride that goes into each of our mattresses.

The video is so amazing it earned Flourish a 2013 Gold Addy award from the American Advertising Federation – Cleveland.  Watch it and you’ll see why.

Take a break and step into our factory for a few minutes.  You’ll leave refreshed!

Organic Mattresses – No, you can’t eat them

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

We make organic mattresses.

No, you can’t eat them.

Yes, I’m asked that.

I’m not insulted by the “can you eat them” question. The concept of non-food organics has largely not entered the public consciousness yet, but it will. Remember not too long ago organic food wasn’t even being considered by many.

As a kid, I didn’t know organic vegetables existed. Organic was as foreign to little me as fois gras or bidets (it squirts where??!!)

Is this an organic vegetable washer? What's organic?

Is this an organic vegetable washer? What’s organic?

Even after encountering the concept as a pre-teen (about organic produce, not bidets), organic food was confined to specialty stores populated by specialty people.

I never thought about the vegetables from my family’s garden as organic. Those were just vegetables.

Organic as a concept

Now in 2014, organic food has not only moved into the mainstream as a healthy eating option but as a familiar concept.

People now discuss the health benefits of organic food, and these considerations affect buying choices. Before these choices could happen, though, they first had to realize there were different options.

Now they are beginning to realize they have similar options with mattresses.

While all of us spend about a third of our lives in beds sleeping, the materials closest to our faces for most of the night (or day if a night shifter) have been ignored. Why? I don’t know.  Mattresses were “just there.” In the past someone would consider how a mattress felt but not even think about the materials inside or how they might affect health.

mom and baby grocery storeThankfully, an ever expanding circle of people are learning they can get a luxurious mattress without simply accepted materials as a given.

The truth is a lot of mattresses have questionable chemicals and synthetics: PFCs, flame retardant chemicals, pesticides and more. There is a choice to purchase mattresses with or without them.

They exist

Our belief at Naturepedic, supported by our involvement in scientific and environmental groups, panels and discussions, is it’s healthier to sleep on organic materials and avoid many of the synthetics and chemicals that have become industry standards.

This is our business, designed not as a marketing gimmick but built from our core philosophy outward. We believe fewer chemicals means healthier sleep.

Organic mattresses exist, and they are great.

 

You still can’t eat them, though.