Tag - BPA

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Making Better Decisions: Choosing Safer Toys as Gifts
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Making Better Decisions: Questions to Ask Before Purchasing Plastic Toys
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Regrettable Substitutions In Consumer Products
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The Ubiquitous Bisphenol A – Should I Be Worried About It?

Making Better Decisions: Choosing Safer Toys as Gifts

When beginning your research for safer toys, start here to learn more about wood toys, and don’t forget my key questions to ask yourself before purchasing a plastic toy. While we can’t replace everything in our house immediately (it’s too expensive for me, even if I could get my kids to give up many of the toys they love at once!), we can strive to make better choices going forward, and holidays and birthdays make a great opportunity to do so. 1) Tell your friends and family that you are looking to make more conscious decisions about the toys you’re bringing into your home. Recommend some brands you’re interested in (here and here are some suggestions), and offer key terms they should look for on packaging and websites. Key terms: Organic, BPA-free, Phthalate-free or nonphthalate, type of plastic (food grade preferred) Terms to avoid if they are unsubstantiated: Eco-friendly, Green, Natural, Non-Toxic. Ask yourself why they are Eco-friendly, Green, Natural[…]

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Making Better Decisions: Questions to Ask Before Purchasing Plastic Toys

Thanks for joining me on our hunt for safer toys! Last week, we talked about wood toys for toddlers and preschoolers, like my own 19 month old daughter and nearly 4 year old son. I was on a mission to find safer action figures and dinosaur toys my son might still be interested in playing with. The wood toys I found didn’t meet that criteria, though there are some available. We all need to find our own level of comfort with what we provide to our children, so I began to look for some safer plastic toy options. PLASTIC TOYS Here are the questions I ask myself when looking at plastic toys, in order of what I personally consider to be the most important factors regarding safety. 1) Is it BPA free or non-detectable? Generally, I only thought of Bisphenol A as it relates to baby cups and bottles, food storage containers, etc. However, BPA is a phthalate, and a[…]

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Regrettable Substitutions In Consumer Products

Questionable chemicals associated with health and developmental issues such as cancer, thyroid disruption and learning disabilities can show up in the most innocuous of consumer products. These chemicals sometimes, although infrequently, garner enough bad press to get them removed, either voluntarily or involuntarily. Unfortunately, removal may not be what it seems. Why? Because an offending chemical can be removed simply to be replaced with a similar, possibly worse chemical. Called “regrettable substitution” by the Environmental Defense Fund and other organizations, this strategy may temporarily solve a company’s marketing or PR problem but does little to get an actual safer product to the consumer. And there are virtually no regulations to prevent this. BPA Take for example Bisphenol-A, or BPA. Following an outcry from the private and academic sectors on BPA’s links to hormonal disruption and connections to cancer and diabetes, the FDA banned it from baby bottles and sippy cups in 2012 (although according to the FDA it was not[…]

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The Ubiquitous Bisphenol A – Should I Be Worried About It?

Bisphenol A (BPA) is currently the subject of many articles, blogs, news reports and scientific studies. Several countries have already banned BPA in some children’s products, as have some states in the U.S. Is BPA exposure really something you should be worried about? In fact, it is. Exposure to BPA is almost inevitable. Plastic infant bottles Canned foods, including infant formula – the BPA is in the epoxy resin lining of the cans Water bottles – usually those marked with a “7” on the bottom Plastic food storage containers and packaging That’s not to say that BPA is found only in food-related items – it’s also in CDs, hard plastic toys, cell phones, computers, and a host of other products. But, currently, experts believe that the primary entrance point of BPA into the body is through food, water (BPA-laden epoxy resins even line some water supply pipes), and food or drink containers and packaging. The BPA leaches into the food[…]

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