Posts Tagged ‘Parenting’

Making Decisions Monday: The Honest Company

Monday, April 21st, 2014

“Making Decisions Monday” is a blogging series by Naturepedic marketing director and mom of one, Heidi Baumgart, and her path to making better purchasing decisions for her family.

Anchors

Meet Momo.

When I first became a parent, there was a lot to research in general about baby “stuff.” Of course the one thing that all my parent-friends joked about needing the most was diapers. Which to choose? Ads, coupons, product packaging overwhelm you when you stand at the wall-o-boxes at any retail establishment. Marketing message inundate you: best wetness protection, best fit, cute designs… What diapers were really best!? Yes, you’re on the Naturepedic blog, so yes, I considered cloth. My husband just didn’t love the thought of it. My mom had visions of 1980′s “rubber pants” that were bulky and a mess. So with two votes against one, we went with disposable.

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Let’s try a few designs too…

I believe in “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all,” so I’m won’t mention the diaper brands I have tried. Bulky, smelly, instant diaper rash with one brand! etc. And what is in them? Moving on.

When I first started working for Naturepedic, I heard about The Honest Company. Sounded good. Looked great! So off I went to our brand new local buybuybaby to purchase some in person.

Our nursery is nautical themed, so of course I grabbed the adorable anchor pattern.

Before I continue, full disclosure of course: The Honest Company didn’t ask me to write this, they aren’t paying me to write this, and I actually forgot my buybuybaby coupons so I paid full price for the diapers. 

I’m obsessed with the diapers. Seriously. And for a few reasons.

Momo checks out her new diapers.

Momo likes ‘em.

First of all: I know I made a better decision. The Honest Company diapers are made with PLA which is a potato starch plant based fiber. I know the benefits of PLA! We use the fabric made of corn and potatoes in some of our organic mattresses!

Secondly: They are free of: chlorine processing, latex, lotions, fragrances, common allergens, phthalates, optical brighteners, PVC, heavy metals, organotins (MBT, DBT, TBT) & harsh petrochemical additives. Well I love that. I know that using latex – even organic latex is a no-no for baby products because babies can be highly allergic to it! And, just like our crib mattresses, there’s no need for PVC or petrochemicals.

Third: Okay, plain old mom love here. They fit amazing. They are designed wonderfully and have you SEEN the cute designs? I love coordinating baby outfits anyways and now cute flowers or fruit or animals show instead of some over-marketed cartoon character.

So a necessary commodity becomes a smile a half a dozen times as day. Try ‘em. You like em, too. Our friend Beau of #theoandbeau wears The Honest Company diapers, too, and has a coupon code for you.

The Honest Company Shampoo/Body Wash

When you are out right now, Honest is in stores too!

P.S. If you’re an in-person shopper too, I found our other The Honest Company favorite: body wash/shampoo at Costco in a two pack. :)

The Changing Role of Dad at Dad’s 2.0

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Life is no longer a 1960′s television show. Back then, dads were the sole bread-winners and had little to do with their children (other than discipline). With more and more women advancing in the workplace, and traditional parenting roles being flipped or mixed, today’s dad is emerging as a jack-of-all trades able to handle multiple duties. The good news is, judging by the “dads” in attendance at the Dad’s 2.0 Summit in New Orleans, today’s generation of men are eager and up to the task.

urlTwenty years ago, the only way you were going to get 300 guys in a room watching a movie was if it was a Chuck Norris marathon. Well, at Dad’s 2.0 Summit, the presentations were much more substantive than Missing in Action 27. These dad’s care . . . not only about being good parents, but equally on being good spouses. It sounds simple, but it is true: the key to a healthy marriage often starts with eliminating conflict associated with raising children. When parents work together to raise the children and do what they can to help each other, everybody wins. Children should be a blessing – not a wedge – enjoyed by the couple.

One of the most interesting things is the impact of technology on parenting. At Dad’s 2.0, real life problems were addressed – such as parents dealing with cyberbullying, finding the right balance between physical activity as compared to the latest internet game, and making sure to protect children in a world of predators.

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Naturepedic’s David meets a crocodile at this year’s Dads 2.0 Summit

Just as important, how about discussions about products . . . and excessive chemicals . . . and education! What is interesting about this “blogger” conference is that even though there was a lot of guidance on being a better blogger – taking better pictures, maximizing search engine optimization, and creating better content – all of those blogging discussions were ultimately designed to empower all dads to become better fathers and to assist others. The whole space was created so Average Joe’s could find other Average Joe’s to navigate the adventure of parenting together.

Yes, a lot of dads and bloggers will tell you they seek out these types of forums for help . . . for support . . . and sometimes, even just to vent and be appeased that other dads are having the same struggles. More positive, though, the forum has become a proactive one where great ideas are shared, where mentoring takes place, and where child successes and accomplishments are celebrated and become inspiring. It is no longer a reactive vibe, where dads that need help seek out answers. Rather, it is dads stepping up to the plate . . . saying they do want to be the best father they can be . . . and joining with other dads on not only being jacks-of-all-trades, but masters of all.

Perhaps the most poignant discussion was titled “Parenting it Forward: Compensating for Our Own Flawed Fathers.” Flawed struck me as an unfair term. Truth is, life was different 30 or 40 years ago. Our dads actually did quite well and, thanks to their sacrifices, generation after generation enjoyed progress. If dads today can take the best parenting qualities of the past, and embrace new techniques to deal with a fast-changing world, then today’s dads will hopefully be able to provide the fundamental thing all parents want to give their children: a life better than their own.

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Hundreds of dads paying their way and showing up at a weekend summit about being a better parent is a great start for that goal . . . but there is much, much more to be done.