Tag - chemical legislation

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The Truth About Organic Cotton Farming
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The Importance of Non-toxic Baby Products According to a Pediatrician
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Organic Challenge Week 2: Health & Beauty Products
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Mattress Label: The Accurate Labeling Act
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The Truth About Flame Retardants in Mattresses
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Safer Products? The EPA Takes First Steps Under New Chemical Law
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States Ban Chemicals of High Concern from Children’s Products
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Aren’t You Required to Have Flame Retardants In Mattresses By Law?
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Jessica Alba, Naturepedic and ASBC Members Take to the Senate
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California’s Green Chemistry Initiative Debuts Three Year Plan

The Truth About Organic Cotton Farming

It’s easy to assume that products containing farmed materials are inherently healthier. By choosing a product made with home-grown ingredients, you cleverly avoid all those harmful toxins and chemicals that factories use to mass-produce their goods, right? Wrong! And that’s where organic farming comes in. It may surprise you to learn that cotton—the most often used natural fiber in the world—is also the world’s most chemically-treated crop. While cotton is a staple of the textile industry, not all cotton is organically farmed. Conventional cotton, by contrast, is more harmful to the environment with a 64% higher potential for its production to contribute to global warming. On National Farmer’s Day, let’s take a moment to consider the advantages of organic farming for both our health and the environment. At Naturepedic, we are proud to offer mattresses made with certified organic cotton that’s organically farmed, producing fewer greenhouse gases, improving soil quality, and utilizing less energy overall. Did you enjoy watching where[…]

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The Importance of Non-toxic Baby Products According to a Pediatrician

All families agree: the items that their baby touches or contacts should be safe, their construction should be safe, and the materials that they are made out of should be safe. In reality, this is a concept that should not have to be written about. Why discuss something as obvious as not exposing your baby to harm? Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. How Do We Know if a Material is Toxic? When we talk about materials, we are really talking about the chemicals that make up these materials. Chemicals, of course, can be very good. All the materials we breathe, drink, touch, and see are composed of chemicals. Many of them are harmless—but not all. It turns out that in the United States, roughly 65,000 chemicals are manufactured and released, which we regularly come into contact with in our everyday routines. These chemicals serve an incredibly wide range of purposes—including the structure of a material (think the plastic in a[…]

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Organic Challenge Week 2: Health & Beauty Products

Our skin absorbs 60% of what we put on it. That is a large percentage, especially for women who use, in some cases, 2x the beauty products that men do. Using organic beauty products substantially lowers your exposure to potentially harmful ingredients present in non-organic products. These harmful ingredients include synthetic fragrances, artificial dyes, and toxic chemicals that are associated with endocrine disruption, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and other health concerns. Studies have shown that the toxic ingredients in beauty products have been found in biopsy samples from breast tumors, ovarian cancer and more. Many of the chemicals and components that are in our everyday products have not been tested extensively for health affects. The minimal testing that has been done yielded some frightening results, so we’re encouraging you to trade out some of your common beauty products for our non-negotiable beauty products. 1. Deodorant No surprise that conventional deodorants contain toxic chemicals that have been linked to health issues over the[…]

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Mattress Label: The Accurate Labeling Act

We understand our consumers. Most of the people who love the Naturepedic brand are health-conscious and appreciate transparency, especially when it comes to making purchases and our own mattress label. When we find information that could help our friends make the best possible decisions for their own families, we feel that it is our responsibility to share that information. It has been brought to our attention that a new bill will soon be voted on—The Accurate Labels Act (H.R. 6022.) The Accurate Labels Act is introduced and sponsored by Congressman Adam Kinzinger (R) – Ill. The Overview of the proposed bill states: To amend the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act to require that Federal and State mandated information declarations and labeling requirements applicable to the chemical composition of, and radiation emitted by, consumer products meet minimum scientific standards to deliver accurate and clear information, and for other purposes. At a time when consumers are demanding more transparency when it comes[…]

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The Truth About Flame Retardants in Mattresses

“Everyone has a fear of fire.” These words start the trailer for HBO’s documentary Toxic Hot Seat, a 2013 film exploring the overwhelming presence of flame retardant chemicals in homes, humans, animals, and ecosystems around the globe. How did they get into nearly everything we buy? What are they for, and are they really helping? You’ll find flame retardants in mattresses, couches, car seats, electronics, and building insulation. On the surface, they seem to make sense. Of course we want to reduce the risk of potential fires. However, flame retardants are a very controversial ingredient used in consumer products because they come with potential health risks. Toxic flame retardant exposure builds up in the body and has been linked to cancer, endocrine disruption, cardiovascular disease, cognitive delays, and decreased fertility. Flame retardant chemicals affect people and animals both inside and outside the home. Babies and children are especially at risk due to their still-developing bodies and endocrine systems. Read more:[…]

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Safer Products? The EPA Takes First Steps Under New Chemical Law

On June 22, 2016, the bi-partisan supported Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (LCSA) into law. This law amends the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the federal framework that had been intended to control the use of chemicals in commerce. Intended, because TSCA has widely been seen as ineffective. Driving the new law has been a growing demand by consumers for better regulation over the chemicals found in their everyday products, including housewares, furniture and mattresses. While this is the first substantial update since TSCA was passed in 1976, how much of an impact the update will actually have remains to be seen. Slow Motion Impact One concern is the slow pace of planned chemical review under LCSA, particularly given how many chemicals are found in consumer products. Way back in 2001, the TSCA chemical inventory listed 73,757 chemicals in commercial and since then an estimated 2,000-2,500 in new chemicals applications have been submitted to the[…]

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States Ban Chemicals of High Concern from Children’s Products

Last year on November 19, Vermont issued the final rule for its law “An Act Relating to the Regulation of Toxic Substances” to regulate Chemicals of High Concern to Children in children’s products. Passed in 2014, this law follows similar ones passed by the State of Washington and Oregon, and legislation introduced, but not passed into law, by Connecticut and Florida. Additionally, in 2015, Westchester County in New York banned formaldehyde, benzene, lead, mercury, antimony, arsenic, cadmium, and cobalt from children’s products. If you haven’t followed any of this legislation, a logical reaction might be, why are these needed? Surely the U.S. government doesn’t allow Chemicals of High Concern in children’s products, do they? Sadly, while there rules for children’s products regarding sizes, shapes and other aspects of physical safety, there are virtually no national safeguards for the chemicals in these products. While the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) does ban six types of phthalates from certain children’s product, it[…]

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Aren’t You Required to Have Flame Retardants In Mattresses By Law?

We are commonly asked, “Aren’t You Required to Have Flame Retardants In Mattresses By Law?” This is a common misconception. We are required to pass all State and Federal testing, but we are not required to use a flame barrier to do so. The primary filling material used in most mattresses (but never Naturepedic) is polyurethane foam – a highly flammable petroleum-based material. Due to its high flammability, polyurethane foam is typically treated or wrapped with fire retardant chemicals. Some of these chemicals introduce health and toxicity concerns. In fact, most manufacturers don’t even disclose their fire retardant ingredients. At Naturepedic, we don’t like harsh chemicals, and we certainly don’t like fire retardant chemicals! We consider the best form of fire protection to be superior product design that avoids the need for these chemicals in the first place. Organic cotton, for example, is a far superior filling material because it is significantly less flammable. Through extensive research and creative product[…]

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Jessica Alba, Naturepedic and ASBC Members Take to the Senate

  As Sustainability Officer for Naturepedic, my role is to go beyond the certified organic products we make to strengthen our relationship to the larger sustainability picture including business practices and advocacy. When things go really well, I get to compare notes with others also passionate about sustainability. When things go really, really well, I get to promote sustainability at the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C. with Jessica Alba. Thursday, June 18 went really, really well. Serving as a Naturepedic representative for the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC), I spent the day alongside actress and advocate for safer products Jessica Alba, co-founder of The Honest Company, and a team of talented business professionals, traveling the halls of the U.S. Senate to meet with a variety of senators. As members of the ASBC, we made the case for sensible reform to the outdated Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA). Currently, a draft bill, S. 697, is being considered in the Senate. In[…]

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California’s Green Chemistry Initiative Debuts Three Year Plan

Looking to encourage the creation of safer consumer products, the state of California under its Green Chemistry Initiative launched a draft of its Three Year Work Plan. The draft plan, published in September of 2014, will ultimately focus on specific Priority Products and their associated chemistries for which safer chemical alternatives must be evaluated. By focusing on select products, the plan hopes to encourage overall “market shifts toward a green economy.” Over the next three years the plan will limit its evaluations to seven broad product categories: – Beauty and Personal Care – Building Products and Household, Office Furniture and Furnishings – Cleaning Products – Clothing – Fishing and Angling Equipment – Office Machinery and Clothing Specific types of products within the categories have also been identified for further examination. At this stage specific products have yet to be chosen, with the plan instead looking to lay the roadmap for future regulatory actions by California’s Department of Toxic Substances Control[…]

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