Tag - greenwashing

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How To Tell If Your Organic Crib Mattress Is Truly All Organic
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The Truth About Flame Retardants in Mattresses
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Organic vs. All Natural vs. Non-Toxic: What These Mattress Terms Really Mean
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When is a “Green” Truth not Actually a Truth at All?
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Flame Retardant Soup
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Greenwashing, Mattresses and Rutabagas

How To Tell If Your Organic Crib Mattress Is Truly All Organic

When you’re shopping for a high quality organic crib mattress, you have an idea of what you’re looking for. You want something made without harmful chemicals that has firm support and natural materials like organic cotton. But it’s possible to find a crib mattress made with a few organic components that seems organic on the surface and isn’t truly as safe as you’d hope. How can you tell if your crib mattress is truly all organic so you and your baby can rest easy? 1. Look for the Right Certifications: The number one thing to look for is an organic certification. The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certifies that a mattress is completely certified organic and non-toxic to a strict standard. However, sometimes mattresses may have a GOTS logo that only applies to one component of the mattress, so read closely to make sure the entire mattress is certified. Read More: Understanding the Global Organic Textile Standard “Organic Mattress” Certification[…]

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The Truth About Flame Retardants in Mattresses

“Everyone has a fear of fire.” These words start the trailer for HBO’s documentary Toxic Hot Seat, a 2013 film exploring the overwhelming presence of flame retardant chemicals in homes, humans, animals, and ecosystems around the globe. How did they get into nearly everything we buy? What are they for, and are they really helping? You’ll find flame retardants in mattresses, couches, car seats, electronics, and building insulation. On the surface, they seem to make sense. Of course we want to reduce the risk of potential fires. However, flame retardants are a very controversial ingredient used in consumer products because they come with potential health risks. Toxic flame retardant exposure builds up in the body and has been linked to cancer, endocrine disruption, cardiovascular disease, cognitive delays, and decreased fertility. Flame retardant chemicals affect people and animals both inside and outside the home. Babies and children are especially at risk due to their still-developing bodies and endocrine systems. Read more:[…]

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Organic vs. All Natural vs. Non-Toxic: What These Mattress Terms Really Mean

When it comes to purchasing a mattress, there are a lot of “buzz words” out there that can make it confusing. You might see “natural mattresses,” “non-toxic mattresses,” and “organic mattresses” – what’s the difference between these types of products? It turns out, there is quite a big difference, and we want you to make an informed and educated choice when buying for your family. This blog will explain the difference between natural, non-toxic, eco-friendly and organic mattresses so that you can shop with confidence and find a truly healthier option. Natural Mattresses What’s a “natural mattress” anyway? Unfortunately, this term doesn’t mean much. It could be everything you’re looking for – made with all-natural materials like cotton, wool, latex, etc. Or it could be a marketing gimmick calling out “natural” additives into otherwise chemical-laden products. It’s tough to know what you’re getting when the label doesn’t call out what specifically is natural about the mattress. The truth is, the[…]

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When is a “Green” Truth not Actually a Truth at All?

Given the meteoric increase in the market for green products in virtually every industry, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is increasingly examining eco claims for truthfulness. While browsing online or even down a store aisle shows me “greenwashing” is alive and well, some recent settlements between companies and the FTC do demonstrate that companies are gradually being held to a higher level of truth. One interesting guideline issued by the FTC as part of the commission’s Revised Green Guides is the Overstatement of Environmental Attribute. According to the guideline, “an environmental marketing claim should not overstate, directly or by implication, an environmental attribute or benefit. Marketers should not state or imply environmental benefits if the benefits are negligible.” While this may seem an obvious guideline, the rule goes beyond technical truth into implied truth. Look at the example the FTC provides on its website: Example 1: An area rug is labeled “50% more recycled content than before.” The manufacturer increased the[…]

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Flame Retardant Soup

Do you like soup? I do. You can put all kinds of vegetable and spices into soup. When I make soup my kids ask, “What’s in it?” to find out if I’ve added a veggie they’ve identified as one they don’t want.  My youngest has dug in his heels against broccoli and the older one against mushrooms. They ask because they can’t tell if the offending food is in there.  Do I always tell? No. I sometimes sneak those veggies past them. Not too many parents will fault me for my sneakiness. If, however, I was intentionally sneaking really, really unhealthy, even dangerous, ingredients in that soup, opinions would be different. Synthetic fibers are in one way a lot like soup. A manufacturer can put all types of different ingredients in there and the consumer is probably not going to know. Take polyester. There are different formulations for polyester just like there are different ways to make vegetable soup. When[…]

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Greenwashing, Mattresses and Rutabagas

Consumers are hit with “green” claims everywhere.  An organic rutabaga, or a cup of Costa Rican coffee supporting sustainable business practices, or a “natural” face lotion, or a green … fill in the blank. Sometimes the message is sincere.  That rutabaga may have been grown without synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. Sometimes, not.  That “natural” face lotion may be made with synthetics and chemical additives. To be organic, sustainable, green or eco-friendly in any industry (and those labels mean very, very different things to different people) takes commitment, veracity, diligence, and more commitment.  If a company isn’t committed, they may find it easier to market themselves with words to convince you they are “green” (when they really aren’t). Greenwashing, or marketing a product as natural or green when it isn’t, is bothersome to legitimate businesses like ours. Companies, though, have always tried to take sneaky shortcuts. For consumers, however, greenwashing is confusing, obnoxious and frankly unfair. We want to help you better[…]

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